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biologicaladventures:

Fun fact of the day: the vertebrate eye is highly conserved across species, and fish actually have eyes that are pretty similar to our own eyes. However, they have a really cool function that our eyes don’t: they can regenerate their eyesight. It has been experimentally proven that if you blind a zebrafish (pictured above) by blasting it with light and killing its photoreceptors, it can completely regenerate its eyesight over time. This is due to cell reprogramming, whereby stem cell progenitors are produced on demand to replace cells that have been destroyed.
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biologicaladventures:

Fun fact of the day: the vertebrate eye is highly conserved across species, and fish actually have eyes that are pretty similar to our own eyes. However, they have a really cool function that our eyes don’t: they can regenerate their eyesight. It has been experimentally proven that if you blind a zebrafish (pictured above) by blasting it with light and killing its photoreceptors, it can completely regenerate its eyesight over time. This is due to cell reprogramming, whereby stem cell progenitors are produced on demand to replace cells that have been destroyed.

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libutron:

Pipa pipa, a very, very bizarre South American frog

This strange frog has many common names: Surinam toad, and toad Star-fingered Toad, in English, and Sapo de Surinam, Cururú, Aparo, Rana de celdillas, Rana tablacha, Sapo chinelo, Sapo chola, and Sapo de celdas, in Spanish. What’s more, has the scientific name of Pipa pipa (also rare).

Pipa pipa (Pipidae) is actually a frog (not a toad) that inhabits the eastern region of South America, and Trinidad. These frogs have almost flat body, with triangular-shaped heads. Females are 105-171 mm long, and males106-154 mm. They have very small black eyes which are lidless and beadlike. These frogs have large, flipper-like hind feet. Their forelimbs are short with webless digits that each end in a star-shaped organ. These quadripartite fingertips are one of the characteristics that distinguish Pipa pipa from other species.

This species is best known for their remarkable reproductive habits, that includes direct development of the young; there is no larval stage. The female carries the eggs in a honeycomb structure on her back until they complete development and emerge as miniature adults.

The mating ritual is also striking, it begins when males make a tickling call while in the water. Males grasps the female from above and around the waist in inguinal amplexus. The female initiates vertical circular turnovers while they’re together. The male clasps the female with his forelimbs wrapped in front of her hindlimbs, and they raise off the floor of the stream or pond and swim to the surface of the water to get air. At the top of the arc, they flip, now floating on their backs, and the female releases 3-10 eggs which fall onto the male’s belly. Completing their arc, they flip to their original position, bellies to the ground. The male now loosens his grip and permits the eggs to roll onto her back while he simultaneously fertilizes them. This spawning ritual is repeated 15-18 times. Roughly 100 eggs are laid and fertilized.

The eggs adhere only to the female’s back, possibly due to a cloacal secretion. They do not stick to the male’s belly nor to other eggs already on the female’s back. In the hours after fertilization, the eggs sink into the female’s skin. Skin grows around the eggs, which become enclosed in a cyst with a horny lid. During development, the young grow temporary tails, which are apparently used in the uptake of oxygen. After 12-20 weeks, the young emerge as tailless flat frogs shaped like their mothers, except that they are only 2 cm in length. They are, however, fully developed except for bifurcation of the lobes on the fingertips.

What you see on the picture is a female photographed in Guyana. The black granules in their back are young frogs. They will emerge from under the skin at the time of molting, that is, when the mother sheds her skin.

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Photo credit: ©Matthieu Berroneau

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Inside the Demonstrations in Venezuela

To view more photos and videos from the protests in Venezuela, visit the Chacaíto and Plaza Luis Brión location pages or browse the #SOSVenezuela hashtag on Instagram.

On Tuesday, tens of thousands of demonstrators came together in Caracas, Venezuela’s Plaza Luis Brión to voice discontent with the government over crime, the economy and pressures on free speech.

This protest is the latest in a series of demonstrations over the past several weeks, many of which have resulted in violence between protestors and the police. Opposition leader Leopoldo López, the former mayor of Caracas who the government has charged with stoking the violence, made a speech before the crowds in the plaza before turning himself in to the police.

ancestryinprogress:

boujhetto:

Wine 101 

  1. How-to Choose
  2. How-to Pair w/Food
  3. Using The Right Glass Shows You Have Class 
  4. Basic Types of Wine
  5. Expanded typing of Wines
  6. What Temp For EachType of Wine
  7. Knowing Your Wine Colors
  8. Wine Type Descriptions
  9. Caloric Comparison vs. Beer
  10. Coffees  

A friend once told me (while discussing wines & spirits) to learn about coffees too… " Because you’ll eventually need them, if / when you enjoy too much good spirits."

Infographics: Wine Folleys, Primer Magazine, and Chicago Food Magazine.

How to be an Adult 201

distant-traveller:

A mesmerizing look at Year 4 of the Solar Dynamics Observatory

Four years ago today, the Solar Dynamics Observatory embarked on a five-year mission to boldly go where no Sun-observing satellite has gone before. SDO uses its three instruments to look constantly at the Sun in ten different wavelengths. Called the “Crown Jewel” of NASA’s fleet of solar observatories, SDO is a technologically advanced spacecraft that takes images of the sun every 0.75 seconds. Each day it sends back about 1.5 terabytes of data to Earth — the equivalent of about 380 full-length movies.

SDO launched on Feb. 11, 2010, and it has since captured the amazing views of the ever-changing face of the Sun — the graceful dance of solar material coursing through the Sun’s the corona, massive solar explosions and giant sunspot shows. Enjoy this latest highlight video from year 4 from SDO!

Video credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO

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